First Hawaiian Bank

Email, Phone, Text Scams

How to Protect Yourself from Phishing

Phishing Fraud: Don't Get Hooked!

As part of our continued efforts to protect your financial information, we want you to know about fraud schemes called "phishing" -- scams that attempt to trick you into furnishing personal financial information that can be used to steal money and even identities. The word "phishing" describes a scam used to "fish" for valuable personal information from you. Don't take the bait!

Phishing often involves a fraudulent email using legitimate company materials, such as a logo or Web site "look", as a way of enticing email recipients to provide personal financial information (e.g., passwords or credit card and Social Security numbers). The email often tries to create a sense of urgency for you to "verify" confidential information by threatening loss of your online service or warning you of a security breach. Phishing emails usually prompt you to respond immediately to the email or direct you to a seemingly authentic Web site where you are requested to provide your confidential information. If you comply, the thieves often use your information to make withdrawals from your accounts, make online purchases using your credit card, or even sell your personal information to other thieves.

Phishing may also involve a fraudulent email promising to reward you with money if you complete a survey. The survey will ask you to rate our service and provide suggestions on how we may improve. Fraud occurs when you are asked to provide your account number (checking, savings, credit or debit card), personal identification number (PIN), Social Security Number, and other personal information so that you may receive your monetary reward.

Telephone/Cell Phone calls or messages (voice phishing or vishing) usually involve receiving a pre-recorded message over the phone. The message states that it is from the bank and creates a sense of urgency by telling you that your account has been suspended or locked due to unauthorized access, excessive unsuccessful attempts to gain access or other fraudulent activity. The message will end by telling you that you can reactivate or unlock your account by: (1) pressing a key on your phone (e.g., press “1”) to transfer to the security department after which you will be asked to enter on your telephone keypad your account number (checking, savings, credit or debit card), personal identification number (PIN), Social Security Number, and other personal information, or (2) calling a phone number where a pre-recorded message will ask you to enter your account number (checking, savings, credit or debit card), personal identification number (PIN), Social Security Number, and other personal information.

Text messages (SMS phishing or smishing) involves receiving a text message on your cell phone. The message states that it is from the bank and creates a sense of urgency by telling you that your account has been suspended or locked due to unauthorized access, excessive unsuccessful attempts to gain access or other fraudulent activity. The message will end by telling you that you can reactivate or unlock your account by: (1) calling the phone number provided, or (2) linking to the Internet site provided in the text message. Whether calling the phone number or linking to the Internet site, you will be asked to provide your account number (checking, savings, credit or debit card), personal identification number (PIN), Social Security Number, and other personal information.

Many people across the nation have put themselves at risk for identity theft by responding to one of these official-looking/-sounding, but entirely fraudulent, information requests.

"STOP, LOOK AND CALL"

If you receive a suspicious email, phone call or text message asking you to furnish personal or financial information:

  • STOP. Resist any exaggerated claims that you must immediately respond and provide the information requested. Never provide personal or financial information in response to unsolicited email, voice, or text requests.

  • LOOK. Read the email or text message carefully or listen to the recorded telephone message carefully; ask yourself why the information requested would really be needed. First Hawaiian Bank never sends unsolicited requests for confidential information. If you get such a request, please contact us immediately at the number below.

  • CALL. Call our 24-Hour Customer Service Center at 844-4444 (1-888-844-4444 from the continental U.S., Guam or CNMI) if you receive a suspicious request for information claiming to be from First Hawaiian Bank. For suspicious information requests from other organizations, telephone the organization using a number that you know to be legitimate and tell them about it.

IF YOU'VE BEEN "PHISHED"

If you believe that you have provided sensitive financial information about yourself through a phishing scam, you should:

  • Contact First Hawaiian Bank immediately at 844-4444 (1-888-844-4444 from the continental U.S., Guam or CNMI) to protect your account.

  • Report suspicious activity to the Federal Trade Commission by clicking here.

  • Contact the major credit bureaus and request that a fraud alert be placed on your credit report. The bureaus are: Equifax, 1-800-525-6285; Experian, 1-888-397-3742; and TransUnion, 1-800-680-7289.

 

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